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OS Linux

Instelling samba

4 antwoorden
  • De installatie van Linux als fileserver is gelukt.(Redhat 7.2) Samba heb ik ingeregeld met Webmin (zie C!T okt. 2002 blz 47) Ik kan op de windows machines de fat-drives op de linux machines zien en de bestanden ook openen maar ik kan niet schrijven naar de fat-drives (of bestanden wissen) De shares zijn allemaal ingesteld op 'read/write voor everyone' Wat doe ik fout
  • Post hier je samba config eens door het volgende commando te doen: less /etc/samba/smb.conf (of waar je smb.conf ook staat) M.
  • users goed gemapped? het zou kunnen zijn dat user a in de groep van user b zit is van map 1 user a de eigenaar dan kan user b dit lezen..schrijven dus niet.
  • Dit is de smb.conf # This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the # smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed # here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options (perhaps too # many!) most of which are not shown in this example # # Any line which starts with a ; (semi-colon) or a # (hash) # is a comment and is ignored. In this example we will use a # # for commentry and a ; for parts of the config file that you # may wish to enable # # NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command "testparm" # to check that you have not made any basic syntactic errors. # #======================= Global Settings ===================================== [global] path = /windowsC smb passwd file = /etc/samba/smbpasswd printing = lprng dns proxy = no security = share encrypt passwords = yes workgroup = JOHAN server string = Samba Server socket options = TCP_NODELAY SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192 netbios name = Athlon_Linux log file = /var/log/samba/%m.log load printers = yes wins support = true printcap name = /etc/printcap max log size = 0 [homes] path = /home/johan comment = Home Directories writeable = yes create mode = 0664 directory mode = 0775 public = yes [printers] comment = All Printers path = /var/spool/samba browseable = no # Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print guest ok = no writable = no printable = yes # This one is useful for people to share files ;[tmp] ; comment = Temporary file space ; path = /tmp ; read only = no ; public = yes # A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in # the "staff" group ;[public] ; comment = Public Stuff ; path = /home/samba ; public = yes ; writable = yes ; printable = no ; write list = @staff # Other examples. # # A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's # home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory, # wherever it is. ;[fredsprn] ; comment = Fred's Printer ; valid users = fred ; path = /home/fred ; printer = freds_printer ; public = no ; writable = no ; printable = yes # A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write # access to the directory. ;[fredsdir] ; comment = Fred's Service ; path = /usr/somewhere/private ; valid users = fred ; public = no ; writable = yes ; printable = no # a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects # this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could # also use the %U option to tailor it by user name. # The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting. ;[pchome] ; comment = PC Directories ; path = /usr/local/pc/%m ; public = no ; writable = yes # A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files # created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so # any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this # directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course # be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead. ;[public] ; path = /usr/somewhere/else/public ; public = yes ; only guest = yes ; writable = yes ; printable = no # The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two # users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this # setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the # sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to # as many users as required. ;[myshare] ; comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff ; path = /usr/somewhere/shared ; valid users = mary fred ; public = no ; writable = yes ; printable = no ; create mask = 0765 [User] path = /usr writeable = yes public = yes [Temp] path = /tmp writeable = yes public = yes [Johan] path = /home/johan writeable = yes public = yes [Fat C] path = /windowsC writeable = yes public = yes [Fat D] path = /windowsD writeable = yes public = yes [Fat E] path = /windowsE map archive = no writeable = yes public = yes [etc] path = /etc writeable = yes public = yes

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